Thursday, June 23, 2016

Venison Bacon Burger with Roasted Poblano Aioli

Let's face it, most of us are obsessed with bacon. If you're looking to give your ground venison some extra flavor, grind some bacon into it as well. It'll add fat to an otherwise lean game and will help keep your venison burgers nice and juicy. 

To add a bit of smokiness, we roasted a large poblano pepper, some garlic, chopped it all up and then added it to mayonnaise for a mild, peppery spread. You can roast the poblano on the grill, under the broiler or over the fire of a gas range. This is a super easy recipe that is perfect for the grill this summer. We hope you get the chance to try it!

You can find the recipe here: http://www.jonesdairyfarm.com/recipes/by-product/bacon/venison-bacon-burger-with-roasted-poblano-aioli



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Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Steamed Walleye with Pork Sausage and White Wine Sauce

We've partnered with Jones Dairy Farm to create wild game and fish recipes that incorporate their products. To date, this is one of our favorites! Perfectly steamed walleye fillets lay on a bed of fresh tomatoes and a white wine sauce made of sausage, thyme, and saffron, sprinkled with fresh herbs such as marjoram and parsley from our "garden"-- this made a lovely lunch for two. Find a good loaf of French baguette to mop up the rich broth. 

To view this recipe, visit:  http://www.jonesdairyfarm.com/recipes/by-meal/dinner/steamed-walleye-with-pork-sausage-white-wine-sauce

To view Jones Dairy Farm's other wild game and fish recipes, visit: http://www.jonesdairyfarm.com/recipes/by-product/game-meat-recipes

We also wanted to share a photo from this past weekend. Rick and I went walleye fishing at Johnson Lake in Nebraska with cousins Pete and Aletha Brown. We didn't catch our limit, but it was still a fantastic haul! We caught so many drum, too, which we kept. Even though most people throw them back, drum are tasty-- good enough for a fish fry. Keep that in mind if you ever catch a drum. 

Hope you're all staying cool this summer. It's been in the 90s and pushing 100 here. Makes us a little uneasy because it's only June. 

Sunday, May 22, 2016

Butterflied Grilled Trout with Compound Butter

I have to give my compliments to the Nebraska Game and Parks Commission. Yeah, I do work for them, but the trout fishing opportunities the state provides are phenomenal, especially if you're looking to fill your freezer. No, you won't find Montanan, Where a River Runs Through It-esque, trout fishing here. We have some cold water streams scattered around but the majority of trout fishing occurs in ponds and lakes. Thousands of rainbow trout are raised in hatcheries and stocked in local waters every year. Hardcore trout anglers may scoff, but we work with what we can. These trout are meant to be easy to catch but that doesn't mean that they aren't fun to fight, providing yet another fishing opportunity for young and old, beginners and experts in Nebraska. Not only that-- the trout are quite tasty. 

Just 20 minutes from our house is one such pond. Rick and I have caught limit after limit there this spring and have introduced a few friends. If you know what you're doing, it's like taking candy from a baby. We get to spend a nice morning outdoors and return home with a guaranteed dinner. That's a great time, in my book. Every trout we've caught have been good eating size, and some of the females we've reeled in have been huge. We've been able to catch enough fish to enjoy throughout this summer when the fish will probably be less active. They are so tasty-- a mild salmon flavor. Six bucks per tag for four trout. We'll take it!


Servings: 4
Prep Time: 45 minutes
Cooking Time: 8 minutes
Ingredients:
- 4 whole trout, scaled and deboned
- Your favorite lemon and herb spice blend seasoning
- Kosher salt, to taste
- Olive oil for brushing
Compound Butter
- 4 tablespoons of salted butter, softened
- 1 teaspoon of shallot, chopped 
- Chives, chopped
- Zest of 1 lemon
- Pinch of salt

1. Debone and butterfly trout according to the video at this link: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KkmkbJtrhFY. You'll need fish tweezers to be able to get all the pin bones out. I've done this when the fish have been completely thawed and when it's still partially frozen. I find that deboning trout when it's partially frozen keeps the meat intact better. Trout meat is delicate and when you handle it too much, it does get a little mushy, but it's not a big deal. If necessary, rinse fish under cold water and pat dry with paper towels.

2. To make compound butter, combine softened butter, chive, shallot, zest and a pinch of salt. Lay a piece of plastic wrap on a flat surface, place compound butter in the middle and then roll up compound butter into a log. Twist the ends and refrigerate to harden.

3. Prepare grill to cook over high, direct heat. After the trout have been deboned and butterflied, brush both sides with olive oil and sprinkle lemon-herb seasoning and salt on both sides. Be careful not to over salt. 

When the grill grates get hot, scrub grates with a wire brush and clean thoroughly. Never cook fish on a dirty grill-- it will stick.
4. Cook trout skin-side up for about 3-4 minutes, or until meat is slightly golden. Slide a metal spatula under the fish and carefully flip. Cook skin-side down for an additional 3-4 minutes or until skin is slightly crisp and fish is cooked through. 
5. Serve fish hot with pats of compound butter on top. Warn dinner guests about bones that may have been missed.

Saturday, April 30, 2016

Quail Scotch Eggs


Rick and I were at the Asian grocery store in Omaha and saw fresh quail eggs. We still had some Jones Dairy Farm breakfast sausage in the fridge and thought it would be fun to make mini Scotch eggs. They were easy to make and very tasty.

Honestly, I did try to make this with chukar eggs that our neighbor gave us. But after boiling them, the darn shell would not budge without ripping the white parts. I'm not sure why that happened, but I have read that when eggs are too fresh, and these were very fresh, the shells tend to stick. 

In the United States, I think eggs can keep up to 2 months. They may sit in a warehouse for a month before actually hitting the store. I'm not sure if this is true or not, but the store bought quail eggs definitely peeled much easier.

Scotch eggs are a traditional picnic food that originated in the United Kingdom. They are tasty hot or cold. The mini eggs would make great appetizers as well. The dried tarragon is our own touch, which added a gentle anise-like flavor to the eggs. 

Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cooking Time: 15 minutes
Servings: 10 mini Scotch Eggs
Ingredients:  
- About 10 quail eggs
- 12-ounce roll of breakfast sausage
- 1 tablespoon of flat-leaf parsley, chopped
- 1/2 teaspoon of paprika
- Dash of cayenne pepper
- 1/2 teaspoon of dried tarragon
- 1/2 cup of Italian-style breadcrumbs
- 1 egg, beaten
- 1/3 cup of all-purpose flour
- Vegetable oil for deep frying

1. Bring a small saucepan of water to a boil. Gently lower quail eggs into the water and cook for 3 minutes. Remove eggs and run cold water over them to cool. 
When cool enough to handle, carefully peel the quail eggs.  
2. In a medium bowl, combine breakfast sausage, parsley, paprika, cayenne and tarragon. 
Place about 3 tablespoon of the sausage mixture in the palm of your hand. Flatten it out and place a cooked, peeled quail egg in the middle.  
Gently work the sausage around the egg, encasing the egg and sealing it completely. 
Place eggs on a cookie sheet lined with parchment paper to prevent sticking.  
3. Prepare your dredging station by placing the beaten egg, breadcrumbs and flour in separate bowls.  
Lightly roll Scotch egg in flour, shaking off excess. Then dip it in the beaten egg and then cover completely with breadcrumbs.  Place the dredged Scotch egg back onto the parchment paper. Repeat with the rest of the quail eggs.  

4. In the meantime, heat oil over medium heat until it reaches 375º Fahrenheit. Deep fry eggs until golden brown and the sausage is cooked through, about 5 minutes. They are very crispy when you eat them fresh, but they will be hot! 


Scotch eggs are also tasty cold, though they won't stay crispy. Pack them for your next picnic or lunch! 



















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Friday, April 22, 2016

Linguine with Morel Mushrooms and Parmesan


I enjoy pasta, but I don’t like the creamy stuff. Red sauce, I’ll eat up readily, but the white creamy stuff—not my thing. Instead, I throw together a more buttery and herby pasta at home that is quick and easy, perfect for days when I don’t have lots of time to spend in the kitchen. For the base, all you need is pasta, butter, lots of Parmesan cheese, garlic, olive oil and fresh parsley. As for the other ingredients, I throw in what I have on hand—leftover chicken, turkey, sautéed shrimp, sausage, or whatever. Maybe I’ll add in a little bit of fresh thyme or red pepper flakes.

This time of year, however, the morel mushroom is the star ingredient. This is one of my absolute favorite ways to prepare morels. The combination of fresh parsley, meaty mushrooms, salty Parmesan cheese and good Irish butter just sings spring to me. If you’d like your pasta a tad bit creamy, then mix in a little heavy whipping cream.

Don’t worry too much about measurements, though, because this recipe can be adjusted to your taste. In fact, the measurements here are just guesses. Cook to your liking and enjoy. 

Prep Time: 15 minutes
Cooking Time: 30 minutes
Servings: 4 -1 pound of uncooked linguine pasta
Ingredients:
- Morel mushrooms, rinsed and halved or quartered lengthwise
- 6 cloves of garlic, minced (or more-- you can't have too much!)
- 1 large shallot, finely chopped
- 2 tablespoons of fresh Italian flat-leaf parsley, chopped
- 1 tablespoon of olive oil + 1 tablespoon of butter
- 8 tablespoons of Kerrygold slated Irish butter (or regular)
- Grated Parmesan cheese, to taste
-  Grated zest of one lemon
- Kosher salt and freshly cracked pepper
- Extra virgin olive oil for tossing

1. Bring a large pot of water to a boil; add a generous pinch of salt to the water. Follow package directions to cook pasta to al dente. Drain pasta but reserve cooking liquid for later use.

2. In a large pan, heat up 1 tablespoon of olive oil and 1 tablespoon of butter over medium heat. Add shallot and cook until translucent, but do not brown.
3. Turn up heat to medium-high and add morel mushrooms and a pinch of salt. Sauté until mushroom soften and given up most of their moisture. Cook in batches for better browning. 

Once mushrooms are cooked, add garlic and cook for 30 seconds until garlic becomes aromatic but do not brown, stirring frequently.
4. Turn down heat to medium-low. Add in 8 tablespoons of butter to the mushrooms and wait until it melts. Toss in cooked pasta, Parmesan cheese, freshly chopped parsley and lemon zest. 
5. Loosen up pasta by ladling in a bit of the reserved pasta water and extra virgin olive oil. Add salt and pepper to taste. Heat pasta thoroughly and serve with more Parmesan sprinkled on top.    

Serve hot!





















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